Anagrams Analogous

A friend forwarded me an e-mail containing some creative anagrams that I’d like to share. I thought the subject fit with the scrambled-word theme of some of my other popular posts. Plus there’s a legitimate Jane Austen connection.

By rearranging the letters in the following words, you can construct something surprisingly apropos:

Presbyterian = best in prayer

Astronomer(s) = moon starer  (or = no more stars)

Desperation = a rope ends it

The eyes = they see

Dormitory = dirty room

Slot Machines = cash lost in me

Snooze alarms = Alas! No more Zs

Eleven plus two = Twelve plus one

In the novel Emma, Frank Churchill decides to liven up a dull evening with a game of anagrams, giving his secret fiance (Jane Fairfax) two words to unscramble in turn. Through the first, they share a private joke. But with the second, he teases her unmercifully.

Frank Churchill placed a word before Miss Fairfax. She gave a slight glance round the table, and applied herself to it… The word was blunder; and as Harriet exultingly proclaimed it, there was a blush on Jane’s cheek which gave it a meaning not otherwise ostensible. As Mr. Knightley quickly surmises, These letters were but the vehicle for gallantry and trick. It was a child’s play, chosen to conceal a deeper game on Frank Churchill’s part. 

Not Mr. Churchill’s finest moment.

I thought it would be great to finish this post with some clever rearrangement of the letters in Jane Austen’s name. Couldn’t find one. The name of one of her books, then? Not much luck there either. This is the best I could come up with:

Persuasion = rue passion.  

I suppose that is appropriate, because for years both Anne Elliot and Captain Wentworth must have regretted their love for each other that, so far, had only brought them pain. Fortunately, they had a second chance and made the most of it.

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About Shannon Winslow

author of historical fiction in the tradition of Jane Austen
This entry was posted in fun & games, Jane Austen, Jane Austen Quotes and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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